Friday, October 17, 2008

Fine Art Friday - St. Paul

St. Paul Writing His Epistles by Valentin de Boulogne or Nicolas Tournier
St. Paul Writing His Epistles - Tournier or Boulogne

St. Paul Writing
St. Paul at His Writing Desk - Rembrandt van Rijn

St. Paul by Masaccio
St. Paul - Masaccio

Conversion of St. Paul by Francesco Mazzola
The Conversion of St. Paul - Francesco Mazzola

Conversion of St. Paul by Michelangelo
The Conversion of St. Paul - Michelangelo

Conversion of St. Paul by Caravaggio
The Conversion of St. Paul - Caravaggio

St. Paul by El Greco
St. Paul - El Greco

Paul Preaching in Athens by Raphael
Paul Preaching in Athens - Raphael


Paul Preaching in Ephesus Eustache Le Sueur
Paul Preaching in Ephesus - Eustache le Sueur

Conversion of St. Paul by Tintoretto
The Conversion of St. Paul - Jacobo Tintoretto


The Execution of St. Paul by Tintoretto
The Execution of St. Paul - Jacobo Tintoretto


In honor of the Pauline year, this week Fine Art Friday will feature St. Paul formerly known as Saul of Tarsus, in works of art. Enjoy.

4 comments:

Evann said...

Lovely, Esther! I am adding this link to my Pauline Year page. Thanks!

Veritas said...

There is much to be said of each individual's interpretation of St Paul's conversion - and each painting has a beauty all its own.
Thanks, Esther! I hope you have a nice weekend.

Kathleen Miller said...

Thank you for this beautiful Fine Art Friday. I enjoyed seeing all the wonderful representations of Paul by various artists.

I am especially drawn to St. Paul writing his Epistles. I can just envision him pouring over this labor of love, sweat on the brow, inspired by the Holy Spirit....

Also, love the Conversion by Caravaggio- it illustrates the real turning point in St. Paul's life and reminds us of a need for everyday an conversion that allows us to grow closer in the Lord.

God Bless!

Esther said...

Wonderful Evann! Glad to be able to add to your Pauline resources.

Veritas, so true! I think I like the Caravaggio one the best. How about you?

Kathy, I don't know if you noticed but none of the depictions seem to portray St. Paul the way he is supposed to have been...short of stature, bald and a hooked nose...