Thursday, July 02, 2015

Marriage


Picture source

The world continues to cry out in victory.  Man's laws have made homosexual marriage the law of the land.  God's laws have been altered to suit misguided people.  It is a triumphant day for the world because they believe marriage equality has been achieved.

Is God weeping or is He seething in anger?  One wonders what is in store for us.  Will God punish such a personal attack?  God is the only one who knows but one thing is certain, He is still in control.

Those of us who follow Him are troubled and trying hard to make sense of this chaotic world turned upside down.  The warning signs were ignored by the majority it seems.  Civil unions were never enough to satiate a lust for control.  It was marriage that was the intended target.

It does appears the world has gone mad or drunk with power.

Christians, especially Catholics are now being targeted.  The world will not rest until the Christians are punished or wiped out.  Christians will continue to be intimidated, falsely accused of intolerance, bigotry and hate.  Ironically, that is exactly how the world reacts to those who do not agree with them or who do not blindly follow like lemmings. The world is very intolerant of those who oppose their wicked ways.  God help you if  one has deep held beliefs or try to defend God's laws.

This persecution has begun.

Churches are in danger of losing their tax-exempt status.  Pastors are being forced to perform so-called "same-sex marriages" or be punished by fines or lawsuits.  Marriage will become a free-for-all for those who want to marry as they please such as multiple spouses, marriage to animals or even inanimate objects.  And, it is frightening to think of the consequence that it will have on children.

Something good may come out of this darkness.  This mockery of marriage may make Christians  appreciate their own marriage vows.   We will see how precious this sacrament that we share with our spouse really is.  How many of us have foolishly taken our marriage for granted!  How many of us go through the motions of every day life without really working on strengthening our marriage?  Why is it that we start appreciate something when it is threatened?

Christians,  and all people of good-will, continue to fight for the sanctity of marriage with prayer, especially as a couple or as a family, by sharing inspirational quotes when emailing or on social networks, and by speaking out respectfully when needed, to defend what God has created and which the world cannot change, no matter what dubious laws they pass.

"We must never forge that only when love between human beings is put to the test can it's true value be seen." - St. John Paul II


Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Guide to Holiness



The following was written by Father Michael Muller, CSSR in his Book:  The Blessed Sacrament:  Our Greatest Treasure.

- make war against venial sins.

-  wean your heart from creatures.

-  endeavor to mortify your attachment to honors, riches and pleasures.

-  spare no trouble for the sake of the kingdom of heaven.

-  practice little but frequent acts of self-denial.

-  keep yourself always in the fear of God.

- adorn yourself with virtues which Jesus loves:  humility, meekness, patience, prayer, charity, faith, peace and recollection.


ACN News - In Egypt, nuns’ work of mercy rebuilds troubled lives



By Oliver Maksan


When Egyptian young Christian women get into serious trouble, society is harshly unforgiving. But in Upper Egypt, a group of Catholic nuns operates a home that provides a safe environment and tools to make a new start.

 “The girls and young women who come to us have big problems,” the nun who heads the home—whose name and location cannot be revealed for security reasons—told international Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need (ACN).

Sister Mariam (not her real name) explained that her charges have been rejected by their families anxious to protect their reputation.

“Some have taken drugs or had an affair with a man. Some have even spent some time in prison. It is our job to steer their young lives back on the right track.”

Twelve girls ages 15 and up are currently full-time residents of the home, while 13 girls attend programs during the day. How long help is provided varies; it may be for several months, but it can sometimes even stretch out for years.

Sister Mariam explained, “The girls learn an occupation, such as hairdresser or seamstress. This ensures that the time they are with us is well spent. It also gives them a certain degree of independence later on.”

“We also try to deepen their relationship with God. In our opinion, this is critical for the girls to regain control over their lives. Most of them held only superficial religious beliefs before.”

The nuns also help the girls understand their social and family background better. “A problem within the family is usually hidden behind the girls’ behavior.”

“We not only work with psychologists, but also have the parents get involved. We tell them, for example: ‘Your daughter may not have felt loved enough and this is why she went looking for a relationship or started using drugs,’” Sister Mariam said.

The prerequisite for reconciliation with the family is that the cases of premarital intercourse, for example, have not become generally known. “When it becomes public that a girl has had intercourse before marriage, she is dishonored. And then her family will no longer be able to keep her at home.”

“In many cases this even results in honor killings—even within Christian families. This is not a rare occurrence in rural areas,” the nun said.

Things get worse, Sister Mariam said, “when a Christian girl sleeps with a Muslim and even gets pregnant; it ends up becoming a major conflict with a religious dimension.”

The nun explained that interfaith marriages “are not accepted socially. The woman must convert.”

Then there are cases of blackmail. “Every year there are cases when a young Muslim sleeps with a Christian girl and records it on his mobile phone. He then threatens to release the video unless the girl converts,” said Sister Mariam.

A local priest said, “Over the last ten years, in our province alone, there were 70 cases in which a Christian girl was being blackmailed into converting. And these are just the ones we know about. The number of unrecorded cases is probably a lot higher.” 


With picture of Egyptian young women at Mass (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:



Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.


For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org

Friday, June 19, 2015

ACN News - On June 21, ACN invites everyone to pray for Father Mourad and the Syrian People



"From the bottom of our hearts we thank the benefactors of Aid to the Church in Need for the solidarity they have shown towards the suffering Syrian people, and to those in our region in particular. And we beg you to continue praying for us."

This was one of the last messages sent to ACN by Father Jacques Mourad, the Catholic priest who was abducted in Qaryatayn in Syria on the 21st of May this year.

The pontifical foundation ACN had been supporting the work of this priest and monk ever since 2004, and especially since the beginning of the Syrian crisis in 2011.

Now – on 21 June, exactly one month from the day he was abducted – ACN is inviting all people to pray for Father Mourad, and for the entire Syrian population.

The 21 national offices of ACN are launching a combined international media campaign, via the news media and social media, using the hashtag: #PrayingForFatherMourad.

The monastic community in Deir Mar Musa, the monastery founded in Syria, to the north of Damascus, by the Italian priest Father Paolo Dall’Oglio, has welcomed this initiative of ACN with joy.

"Your prayers are so important," Father Jihad Youssef told ACN, "not only for the Christians of Syria but also for the many, many Muslims who are in fact the first victims of fundamentalism.”

“In terms of sheer numbers, they are the ones who are suffering most, at the hands of their own coreligionists."

Father Youssef, also a monk in Deir Mar Musa, recalled how in the area of Qaryatayn Father Jacques had become a point of reference not only for Christians but also for the Islamic community in the area.

"He was greatly respected, even by the imams and sheiks," he told ACN. "In the monastery of Mar Elias, where he lived, he took in more than 50 Muslim families, with over 100 children."

Father Jacques also helped these families to rebuild their own ruined homes and gave them food and medicine with the support of ACN.

The head of the Middle East department of Aid to the Church in Need, Father Andrzej Halemba, commented: "Father Jacques always helped all people, be they Christians or Muslims. He helped everyone, but never took sides. Why should such a man be abducted?”

“We can see once again how the war is claiming the best people. Father Jacques is a spiritual leader of Christians and Muslims. People of both religions look up to him and trust him."

As Father Mourad himself had earlier written to ACN, "Our work on behalf of the Muslims is a simple expression of the Church, which is called to help all people – whether the poor, the sick, criminals, sinners or the persecuted."

Also kidnapped along with Father Mourad was a lay co-worker, Boutros Hanna Dekermenjian, an Armenian Christian, aged 38, who had attempted to prevent his abduction.

As Father Youssef has confirmed to ACN, there is no news at present, either as to the fate of the two hostages or as to the identity of their abductors.

Father Youssef, in inviting us all to unite together in prayer, sees the current situation of the Christians in the Middle East as "a true trial of faith. If we truly love the crucified Christ, then we will be willing to offer ourselves for others."


With picture of Father Jaques Mourad (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:




Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.


For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org

Thursday, June 18, 2015

ACN News - Mosul prelate calls for liberation of city, Nineveh Plain – or mass asylum in the West



By John Pontifex


A leading Iraqi prelate has called on world government to increase their efforts to defeat ISIS and restore land and property to some 120,000 exiled Iraqi Christians.

Marking the first anniversary of ISIS’s capture of Mosul, Syrian Catholic Archbishop Yohanna Mouche called on “people who have the responsibility” to come to the rescue of the ousted Christian communities, whose people, he added, long to go home.

In an interview with international Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need (ACN), the archbishop said that military action is the “best solution.”

“We ask everyone to put pressure on the people who have the responsibility to free the [towns and villages] as soon as possible so the people can come back and live in peace in their homes and continue their lives there,” he said.

The archbishop’s comments reflect ongoing frustration felt by a number of senior Middle East clergy about what they perceive as the West’s reluctance to commit to a full-scale intervention to confront and overcome extremism in the region—a move many Church leaders opposed until very recently.

Archbishop Mouche also said that if the West is unable to redouble its efforts in the fight against ISIS, it should open its doors to Christians and other minorities seeking asylum.

“I am calling on the international community: if they cannot protect us, then they must open their doors and help us start a new life elsewhere,” he said, adding, however that “we would prefer to remain in Iraq and be protected here.”

Speaking of his own hardship, the prelate said, “I am like someone who is dreaming or drunk. I can’t understand what is going on around me. It is a nightmare.”

Asked about widespread reports of destruction of religious artefacts and Church buildings in Mosul, he said his contacts with the city had been severed. But he confirmed that “all our heritage is in Mosul, and in Qaraqosh,” on the Nineveh Plain.

He singled out the monastery of St. Behnam, which dates back to the fourth century AD. The monastery is rumored to have been partially destroyed by ISIS.

“We have no news about our churches and monasteries, because we have no-one left in Mosul to report on it,” the archbishop concluded.


With picture of Archbishop Mouche (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:



Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.

For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

ACN News - In Syria, Christians are caught in ‘demonic conflict’



From April 2015 onward, there has been nothing bad news for Syrian Christians, who most recently saw the city of Idlib fall to ISIS, which is today even threatening Aleppo.

“The morale of the people is completely shattered,” said Father Andrzej Halemba  Fear, but also hope can be used to describe the tone of the Christian community in Syria at the moment, Andrzej Halemba, head of the Middle East section of the Catholic pastoral charity Aid to the Church in Need said upon returning from Syria.

“I had already visited the project sites of our partners in January. During my most recent visit, however, I noticed a marked change in mood. Bad news has been piling up since then.”

“The most recent conquests of the rebels in Idlib and other places are especially depressing for Aleppo’s Christians. They are afraid and believe that their city is about to experience even more violence.”

“After all, Aleppo’s Christian district already weathered severe rebel attacks in April. The morale of the people is completely shattered,” Father Halemba said.

He spent several days at the end of May visiting project sites in various places in Syria. “Added to this is the fact that Lebanon practically closed off its borders to Syrian refugees at the beginning of the year.”

“This has hit Christians especially hard because they have a difficult time of it in other countries in the region. Lebanon was their safe haven of choice. They now feel trapped.”

However, Father Halemba said that he also met Christians in other regions who were filled with hope. “In Maaloula, but also in Yabroud or Homs, there is a real drive to rebuild.”

“The people are returning to places that have been freed by the Syrian government and are rebuilding the homes and churches that were destroyed. Schools, such as the Melkite school in Yabroud, are being reopened.”

“Despite all the years of war, there is still so much energy and potential. This even strengthened and encouraged me in my work.”

“We from Aid to the Church in Need have to support these Christians, especially in the restoration of their churches. These renovated houses of worship are like beacons of light. They give the people hope and convey a feeling of normality.”

Father Halemba then talked about how Aid to the Church in Need also supports pastoral projects such as catechism instruction for children and adolescents. “We Catholics have to know our faith. This gives us strength, even when times are hard.”

Father Halemba emphasized that the majority of the aid provided by Aid to the Church in Need is in the meantime being used for emergency relief.

“We have donated aid amounting to about two million euros since the beginning of this year. Decisive for us is helping the Christians so that they can remain in Syria.”

“The affluent have already left. What remains are the poor. They earn no or only low wages. Prices, however, are high. This makes the people dependent on support from the church,” Father Halemba said.

The priest continued by describing how Aid to the Church in Need supports those affected by helping to pay for rent, food and hygiene items through local Church partners.

“The priests go the people and not the other way around. I was able to observe this in Marmarita… It is encouraging to see just how grateful the people are for this.”

“Many of Aleppo’s Christians have found refuge in this Christian town. It is full to bursting. Rents have skyrocketed. Unfortunately, the distress of the refugees is often exploited.”

All in all, Syria is facing enormous problems, Father Halemba said. “Four million people have already left Syria. Fifteen thousand doctors alone have left. Half of the schools are closed.”

“Things are especially hard for the seriously ill. It has been estimated that more people have died in this war from a lack of health care than through fighting. Some Church people say that this has been the cause of more than 350,000 deaths. Compare that with the 220,000 victims of the war.”

“However, the worst thing for me was to hear that more children than women have been killed in the conflict. This is often done deliberately to take the last hope away from the parents. This shows just how demonic this conflict really is.”


With picture of fresh damage to church in Aleppo (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:



Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.


For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org

Friday, June 12, 2015

The Just Complaint of Our Divine Savior



The following is from Father Michael Muller, CSSR, book The Blessed Sacrament:  Our Greatest Treasure.  It is a beautiful reflection on the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus.

"I hear Thee complain of us, O dear Jesus, as Thou didst one day complain to the Blessed Margaret Alacoque, when showing to her Thy heart crowned with thorns:  'Behold this heart of Mine, so full of love for men, that it has shed its last drop of blood for them, and has given them My own flesh and blood as food and drink for their souls; and consider how this heart receives from most men, in return for so great a love, nothing but ingratitude and contempt!  But what grieves Me most is, that I am thus treated even by good and just souls.'

Do you not understand, dear Christian, the just complaint of your Divine Saviour?  Is your heart not touched by it?

'Behold,' says He, 'behold this heart which loves men so excessively; this heart which is always pouring out graces upon them; this heart, so full of pity to receive sinners, to help the poor and indigent; to cure the sick; to console the afflicted; to hear the prayers of all men, at which I have so often entered in Holy Communion.'

Ah!  dear Christian, have you a heart?  Well, if it be not of stone or iron, let it be touched by this touching complaint of the heart of Jesus Christ in the Blessed Sacrament.. Give to your God and Saviour what is due to Him.  Repay Him for the benefit of your creation; repay Him for the benefit of your redemption; for the benefit of the preservation of your life; for the pains of His scourging; for the agony of His crucifixion; but, above all, repay Him, yes, in some measure, repay Him for the excessive love and affection which He bears you in the Blessed Sacrament.

'But how,' you will ask: 'how shall I pay my Jesus for His love to me?  What can I give Him in return?'  Nothing but love.  Love demands love and is contented only with love..."

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Meatless Recipe - Bruscetta



Bruscetta is a fresh tomato sauce served over crisp Baguette toast.  It also makes a good sauce for pasta.  You will need the freshest tomato to get the best flavor.

Recipe:

4 large ripe tomatoes (or approximately 6 Roma Tomatoes)
5 large garlic cloves, minced finely
Fresh Basil leaves, sliced thinly
Salt and pepper to taste
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

Wash the tomatoes and then slice them thinly so that you can dice them into small pieces.  Add the minced garlic, basil and season with salt and pepper. Let side for at least an hour or so.  Serve with toasted garlic baguette slices or over pasta.



Recipe:

Slice a fresh baguette into approximately 1/2 inch thick slices.  Place on a baking sheet.
Brush each slice with extra virgin olive oil.
Sprinkle with granulated garlic (or powder but not garlic salt)

Place in a cold oven and preheat oven at 350 degrees.  When the oven is ready, turn off the oven and let the baguette slices continue to brown for approximately 5 minutes more.  Top each slice with the Bruscetta sauce.





Make sure to refrigerate the sauce.

ACN News - Religious in South Sudan: ‘When we go out in the morning, we don't know if we'll come back alive in the evening’



By Eva-Maria Kolmann


Two women religious had a lucky escape recently. They had only just left the refugee camp when shooting broke out. The man accompanying them was hit by rebel machine gun fire and died instantly. Their habits were covered in blood.

The young country’s civil war is raging just outside the gates of the refugee camp in Juba, which is home to 28,000 families. Sisters of the Congregation of the Daughters of Mary Immaculate regularly visit the sick and needy there.

The Sisters’ average age is just 28. Most of them are from India, where their congregation was founded. For many of them, it is the first time in their lives that they have been confronted first-hand with warfare.

Sister Maya was just washing some items of clothing in the convent, when armed men burst into the room. One of them held a gun to her chin while another held a knife to her throat.

They dragged the young Sister into the dining room, where three other Sisters were sitting reading. Guns were put to their heads, while other men looted the house.

Sister Vijii said afterwards: “It was a deliberate campaign of intimidation. They want us to go away from here!"

Father Albert Amal Raj of the Missionaries of Mary Immaculate, the male branch, has also been threatened numerous times.

"When we go out of the house in the morning, we do not know if we will come home alive that evening,” the Indian priest told international Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need (ACN).

On one occasion his car was stopped and he got beaten up by a policeman. Father Raj said that “they thought our car was a rebel vehicle. Many of them also believe that foreign organizations are supporting the rebels and providing them with weapons and other support.”

“When the policemen realized that I was a priest, they apologized. That is why I now always wear a large cross, very visibly on a chain, so people can see that I'm a priest."

Working in some of the country’s most remote regions, the male missionaries focus in particular on teaching children—who are hooked on war games—to cherish life.

“Many of them have actually witnessed their own family members being killed. Human life is worth very little here,” said Father Raj.

The women religious, meanwhile, are helping people still recovering from Sudan’s more than two decades-long civil war, a conflict that killed more than 2 million and left millions more displaced.

Many were forced to see their husbands, wives, children, parents and siblings brutally murdered.

Sister Vijii is not afraid for her own life, even though she can hear shootings and bombings every day. "Some organizations have advised us to leave South Sudan. It is too dangerous here, they tell us, and there will never be peace.”

“But we have come here to share the sufferings of the people and so, as long as there are still people here, we, too, will stay."


With picture of a Sister working with children in South Sudan (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:



Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.

For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org

ACN News - One year after the fall of Mosul, Iraqi Christians remain in painful limbo



By Marta Petrosillo


One year ago, tens of thousands of Christians fled from Mosul, certain that they would soon be able to return to their homes. A year later, ISIS remains in firm control of Iraq’s second-largest city.

"As the months have passed, so our hopes of returning to our homes have faded more and more,” Father Georges Jahoula, a priest of the Syrian Catholic Diocese of Mosul, told international Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need.

"Many Christians have found themselves obliged to seek this hope elsewhere, outside Iraq,” he said.

For many displaced Christians stranded in Kurdish Iraq emigration seems like the only option left. "They have been torn away from their land.”

“They were given no choice; they were uprooted by force,” said the priest.

News coming out of Mosul and the Plane of Nineveh is only adding to the suffering of the Christian community. Mosul’s Syrian Catholic church of Saint Ephraim was turned into a mosque just yesterday, a cynical gesture by ISIS to mark the one-year anniversary of the capture of the town.

"Incidents such as this, for the fundamentalists, represent a triumph over Christianity, whereas for us they are simply yet another wound in a heart that has already been pierced through and through."

Since the seizure of Mosul and up till today ACN has given over $7.5 million in support of the Christians of Iraq. It is a commitment that will continue to be a priority for this pontifical foundation.


With picture of a Christian waiting for better times in Kurdistan (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:




Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.

For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org