Monday, March 02, 2015

ACN News - ISIS frees some captured Syrian Christians

By John Newton


There was an unconfirmed report that the mosque in the Arab Sunni village of Bab Alfaraj had called on people to attend "a mass killing of infidels." That has not happened thus far.

In a fast-developing, highly fluid story, there are now reports that ISIS has freed 19 Assyrian Christians captured early last week. And earlier reports that 15 Christians may have already been killed in fighting with ISIS attackers were contradicted.

Bishop Antoine Audo S. of Aleppo said, “I contacted the vicar of the Chaldeans in Al Hassake, Father Nidala. He told me that reports about Christians being killed [are] not true.”

In a message sent to Aid to the Church in Need (ACN), Iraq-based Archimandrite Emanuel Youkhana passed on news that the number of Assyrian Christians being held by ISIS currently stands at approximately 155.

Reports indicate that of the Tel Hormizd fighters one woman has been beheaded and two men have been shot. There is no information about who the other executed captives might be. But they may be some of the 13 Christians from various other villages, who were seized while offering resistance to their attackers.

Archimandrite Youkhana added that there was no news about where the families were being held: “Most probably they have been captured and transported to Mount Abdul Aziz, a nearby region controlled by ISIS.”

There was an unconfirmed report that the mosque in the Arab Sunni village of Bab Alfaraj had called on people to attend “a mass killing of infidels” at Mount Abdul Aziz, but that has so far not come to pass.

There are no families left in the 35 Assyrian Christian villages, all remaining villagers have now fled to Hassake or Qamishli.

The number of registered displaced families stands at 800 families in Hassake and 175 in Qamishli. That number may reach 1,200 families.


Editor’s Notes:



Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.


For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org

Pope Francis to Open Worldwide Day of Adoration and Confession

VATICAN CITY — On March 13-14, the Vatican is hoping churches worldwide will participate in an initiative to stay open for 24 hours to underline the need for prayer, contemplation of the Eucharist and a chance to go to confession.

Pope Francis will open the Lenten initiative, called “24 Hours for the Lord” by presiding at a penitential celebration in St. Peter’s Basilica on March 13.

Following the conclusion of this service, a number of churches throughout Rome will remain open for 24 hours, with confessors available as well as Eucharistic adoration.

The Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization, which is organizing the initiative, has invited dioceses, parishes and communities around the world to adapt the initiative to their local situations and needs. It has produced a poster to help with the event, as well as a pastoral booklet in Italian, English, Spanish, French and Polish.

The resource “will enable all people, be they near or distant from the Church, to reflect upon and celebrate the great gift of God’s mercy and forgiveness,” the pontifical council says. To download the poster and acquire this pastoral aid, please go to NovaEvangelizatio.va.      
Read the rest HERE

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Another Good Examination of Conscience


This one comes from Father John A. Kane. I will share the ones not often found in other Examination of Conscience books or booklets.  It is taken from his How to Make a Good Confession and published by Sophia Institute Press.  I highly recommend this little book.

1.  Have I been ungrateful to God for His benefits?

2.  Do I try to hide from God because I love my sin or because I do not have strength of will to make sacrifices for His sake?

3.  Have I failed to give God the respect, the love, and the simplicity of a child toward his Father?

4.  Am I unwilling to cast out and destroy everything that makes my soul unworthy to be the dwelling place of the three divine Persons?

5.  Have I grumbled against God's will?

6.  Do I refuse to accept troubles that come to me as a means of salvation?

7.  Do I trouble others with my grievances?

8.  Have I ignored Christ's voice within my soul when He has asked me for some sacrifice?

9.  Do I lack peace of soul because I don't trust God?

10.  Have I been too proud to accept well-merited correction, even from my confessor?

11.  Do I rely solely on myself and not on God?

12.  Do I rely solely on myself and not on God?

13.  Do I neglect my duties as a creature to my Creator?

14.  Do I have an exaggerated fear of death?  Do I trustfully abandon my past to God's mercy and my future to His love?

15.  Have I abandoned the Catholic Faith?

16.  Have I joined a non-Catholic church?

17.  Have I refused to believe any truths of the Faith or any teachings of the Church?

18.  Did I fail to profess or defend the Faith when required to do so?

19.  Did I read materials or associate with people who  might endanger my faith?

20.  Have I attended or taken part in the marriage of a Catholic in a wedding not approved by the Church.

21.  Have I been unfaithful to daily prayer?

22.  Have I received Holy Communion without reverence?  Have I neglected to make a proper thanksgiving after receiving?

23.  Do I neglect to read Scripture?

24.  Do I let my religious practices annoy others?

25.  Do I neglect to try to correct myself, remembering that I should always strive for perfection?

26. Have I evaded an opportunity to enlighten someone on religious truth?

27.  Do I use God's name carelessly, in anger, or in surprise?

28.  Am I disrespectful, impolite, or discourteous toward my family?

29.  Do I mistreat belittle, or abuse my children?

30.  Am I disrespectful toward the elderly?

31.  Do I endanger my health by eating too little or sleeping too little?

32.  Am I too concerned about my health or my appearance?

33.  Have I attributed bad motives to others, when I could not be certain of their motives?

34. Have I used harsh or abusive language toward another?

35.  Am I rude, impolite, or inconsiderate?

36.  As a husband or wife, have I failed prudently to make an effort to prevent the sins of my spouse?

37.  Have I neglected my duty of preventing those in my charge from committing sin, or correcting them after they have failed?

39.  Am I dating someone who is civilly divorced but is still bound by a valid marriage?

40.  Do I waste money or spend it extravagantly?

41.  Do I waste goods or food?

42.  Have I been stingy with my time, money and talents?

43.  Have I criticized anyone uncharitably?

44.  Am I greedy?

45.  Am I selfish?

46.  Do I indulge in self-pity?

48.  Am I proud?

49.  Am I vain?

50. Do I desire to be praised?

51.  Do I show off?

52.  Have I exaggerated my success?

53.  Have I minimized or explained away my failures?

54.  In my spirituality, do I seek mere personal excellence?

55.  Am I touchy and hypersensitive?

56.  Do I magnify the least oversight or thoughtlessness into an insult or deliberate slight?

57. Am I envious of someone's possessions, talents, or blessings?






Thursday, February 26, 2015

Meatless Friday Recipe - Pierogies



My goodness! I just remembered that I should have been sharing recipes for Lent!

Here is one of our family's favorite lunch time meals. In order to make it for dinner, just make more of them and add a salad and maybe soup as well.  I hope you don't think it strange that we would cook a Polish delicacy with an Asian twist. My sister first made these for me and I found them to be so yummy.

For those of you on the mainland, and especially in the New York City/northern New Jersey area, I am sure will have no problem finding authentic and delicious Pierogi.  If you live in Hawaii, you may have to make your own or settle for Mrs. T.  in the freezer section of the local supermarket.  NOTE:  I would suggest making them yourselves.  It is not difficult.  We prefer the potato and cheese one but there are many variations to try.

Since I am still on the quest to find the right dough for Pierogi I will not share my favorite recipe, because I still do not have one.  But I did find a website chock full of information on the humble but delicious Pierogi. Tasting Poland

Here is my sister's version of the Pierogi with butter and onions.

Pierogi approximately 7 or 8 large ones.  (In order to make enough for your family, or approximately 4 or 6 large ones for each person, just modify the amounts of the butter, oil and green onions) - Boil until they float and drain.
1/4 cup of chopped green onions (scallions for you in New Jersey)
2 TBSP butter (and 2 TBSP. Extra Virgin Olive Oil in order not to use so much butter especially during Lent).

Heat a large skillet and add the butter and olive oil.  Keep the skillet on medium heat.  When the butter and oil are bubbling, add the green onions and then gently place the Pierogi in a single layer on top of the butter/oil and green onions.  Cook until the Pierogi are nicely browned on the bottom and turn and brown the other side.  The green onions should also be browned but be careful not to burn them.



ACN News - ISIS said to have begun executing captured Syrian Christians



By John Newton


In a fast-developing, highly fluid story, there are now reports that ISIS has started killing hostages seized after it took Assyrian Christian villages in Syria’s Hassake governorate—reportedly 15 kidnapped Christians may already be dead.

In a message sent to Aid to the Church in Need (ACN) Feb. 26, 2015, Iraq-based Archimandrite Emanuel Youkhana passed on news of the executions from a contact in Hassake city, adding that the number of Assyrian Christians being held by ISIS exceeds 350.

Archimandrite Youkhana, who supports persecuted Christians in the Middle East, said: “Around 15 young Assyrians are martyred. Many of them were fighting to defend and protect the villages and families.”

From the village of Tel Hormizd 14 people were taken—12 men and two women—who were fighting to defend their homes.

Reports indicate that of the Tel Hormizd fighters, one woman has been beheaded and two men have been shot. There is no information about who the other executed captives might be, but they may be some of the 13 Christians from various other villages who were seized while offering resistance to their attackers.

In addition to these fighters, 81 people were seized from Tel Jazira, 21 from Tel Gouran, five from Tel Feytha and three from Qabir Shamiya. All of the above are being held in the Arab Sunni village of Um Al-Masamier.

Also, 51 families from the village of Tel Shamiram have been taken, with an average of five persons per family.

Archimandrite Youkhana said: “It is believed there are casualties and many Assyrians have been killed in the village.”

He added that there was no news about where the families were being held: “Most probably they have been captured and transported to Mount Abdul Aziz, a nearby region controlled by ISIS.”

From another source there was an unconfirmed report that the mosque in the Arab Sunni village of Bab Alfaraj had called on people to attend “a mass killing of infidels” at Mount Abdul Aziz tomorrow, Feb. 27, 2015.

There are no families left in the 35 Assyrian Christian villages. All remaining villagers have now fled to Hassake or Qamishli.

The number of registered displaced families stands at 800 families in Hassake and 175 in Qamishli. That number may reach 1,200 families.


With picture of refugees seeking shelter in Hassake. Photo courtesy of the Assyrian Church in Beirut (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:



Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.


For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Ida, Night and Christian Martyrs

Spoiler Alert.

The annual Academy awards brought interest in the foreign film Ida. I must admit that the movie had been sitting in our Netflix queue for awhile before we finally felt a push to watch it.

It has been my experience that European movies with Catholic themes have not treated Catholicism with much reverence or respect. Maybe it is the culture, but I have found that a movie such as the one on Saint Hildegard of Bingen, Vision, offended my sensibilities. An example is the common occurrence of men and and women, more specifically, nuns and priests, kissing each other full on the mouth. Therefore, before watching Ida, I checked out Steven D. Greydanus' review. You can watch the quick review here.

Short summary, this movie is about a young sister about to take her vows.  She contacts her only living relative, an aunt and soon learns that she was in fact a Jewish girl.  She and her very promiscuous aunt, a Communist prosecutor, go on a journey to find out what happened to Ida's family.

They find out the very horrific fact that her family had been murdered.  She alone survived the killing. The aunt finds out her son had also been murdered.  And, the movie continued.

The movie itself was very interesting from the beginning.  Based on what I could find by Catholic reviews, I trusted that the movie would not offend.  But offend it did.   I could understand why the aunt went to men for comfort or why she drank.  It wasn't surprising that she ended up taking her own life.  But what I really had trouble with was that this young nun, sheltered practically her whole life in a convent, leaves the convent as she is about to take her vows and starts experiencing life.  She dresses in her dead aunt's high heels and tight dress, she goes to a nightclub and she ends up losing her virginity to an admirer.  At the end, she leaves the man, puts her habit back on and apparently goes back to the convent.

I am not sure why I chose to read Elie Wiesel's Night during Lent.  It is a difficult and dark book to read.  What it very troubling is the loss of faith and the loss of hope by the writer.  He was a young and self-described devout Jewish teen when his family was forced from their home and taken to the concentrations camps.

It is the lack of courage by the Jews, the trust they have in the tormentors, they way they turn on each other, and Wiesel's anger with God that makes this book a poor read.  I was hoping that in the middle of their suffering and persecution, he would have held on to hope.  But the anger, the rebellion towards God was just too much.  I am not through with the book yet (almost done) so I hope by the end of the book, I would have been wrong about Wiesel.

Finally, there is the almost daily reporting of Christians being killed simply for professing a faith in Jesus Christ.  They die with Jesus on their lips.  They give me hope.




ACN News - In wake of ISIS horror, Egyptian Christians consecrate first-ever church in Sinai



By Oliver Maksan


"The Church in Egypt has been strengthened by the murder of our brothers in Libya." Such was the reaction by Coptic Catholic Bishop Youssef Aboul-Kheir of Sohag to the beheading of 21 Orthodox Coptic men in Libya by ISIS.

The guest workers in Libya "suffered a holy death with prayers on their lips. They went to their deaths just like the early Christians,” the bishop told international Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need (ACN).

As fate would have it, ISIS released gruesome video of the executions on the very day, Feb. 15, 2015, that Egypt’s Catholic Coptic Church celebrated the consecration of the first ever church in Sinai, in the community of Sharm El-Sheikh, Our Lady of Peace—a name chosen by Susanne Mubarak, widow of the late ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

Mrs. Mubarak, who was educated by Catholic nuns, ensured that construction of the church could proceed after years of delay and opposition by local political leadership.

“This is a great day of joy for Catholics in Egypt,” the local ordinary, Coptic Catholic Bishop Makarios Tewfik of Ismailia, said at the consecration ceremony.

“We have a number of places of worship in Sinai”—a famous tourist destination where hundreds of hotels line the coast known for its spectacular coral reef—“but these are chapels or even just rooms in normal houses.”

“The Church of Our Lady of Peace is the first proper church building that was built for the sole purpose of worshiping God,” he said.

Father Bolos Garas, the local pastor will celebrate three services in the church every Sunday.

“I am a Coptic Catholic priest. However, there are very few Coptic Catholics here, just a handful of families. Most of our faithful are tourists or foreign workers. For this reason I not only celebrate Sunday Mass according to my Church’s rites, but also according to the Roman rites, in both Italian and English,” he said.

The English-language service will primarily cater to Filipinos, guest workers in the local hotel industry, while a sizeable community of Italian retirees who spend winters in Sharm El-Sheikh will hear Mass in their own language.

Patriarch Ibrahim I Sidrak, head of the 200,000-member strong Egyptian Coptic Catholic church, presided over the consecration ceremony.

Meanwhile the brutal killing of the 21 men hangs like a cloud over Egypt’s Christian community, which already faces home grown Islamic extremism.

 "I am afraid of the Salafists in the country,” said Bishop Aboul-Kheir, who added that “they speak with forked tongues. The Muslim Brotherhood is opposed to society anyway. So there exists an internal danger in Egypt itself."

Egypt’s Christian leaders are concerned that extremists may be voted into power during upcoming parliamentary elections.

The new Parliament should ensure that “Christians will finally be able to live as equal citizens," the bishop said, stressing that, among other rights, religious liberty for all should guarantee the freedom to construct new churches.

The prelate called on the country’s Muslim community to choose moderation. Its highest theological and intellectual forum, he said, “the Al-Azhar University, is regarded as a moderate force.”

However, he continued, “there are many aspects of the institution’s teachings and programs that are anything but moderate.”

“For example, the use of force in cases that are considered apostasy by Muslims”—including their conversion to Christianity—“is justified. This contradicts moderate views.”

The construction of Our Lady of Peace was made possible by financial support from Aid to the Church in Need.


With picture of consecration of Our Lady of Peace (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:



Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.

For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org

Friday, February 20, 2015

ACN News - Iraqi bishop – ‘We are hated because we persist in wanting to exist as Christians’


By Archbishop Bashar Warda


Christianity in Iraq is going through one of its worst and hardest stages of its long history that dates back to the first century. Throughout all these long centuries, we have experienced many hardships and persecutions during which we offered caravans of martyrs.

During the past year, more than 125,000 Christians have been forced to flee from their villages only because they chose to remain Christians and refused the conditions ISIS imposed on them. They had to leave at night, under the cover of darkness. Many of them trod their own path of Golgotha for long hours, having left everything behind, other than their bare clothes.

Today, we have families that are relying completely on the charity of others. Less than a year ago, these same families were living in their own houses and were self-supporting, with sufficient or abundant regular incomes. These days, we pray in tents, having left behind ancient churches that told the story of a flourishing Christianity, blessed for centuries with strong, willing believers and martyrs.

Too many families have lost confidence in their homeland. This should not surprise anyone. The homeland of Christians has rejected them and thrown them up. They have chosen to emigrate to the unknown, confident that they will be more secure. Our friends and families are queued up, waiting for months and years in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan for a chance to move again, maybe for the last time, to North America, Europe, or Australia.

It is an understatement for me to simply say that we are in desperate need of financial and material support so that our families may stay and survive, or depart and survive.
This crisis is one of chronic urgent need.

For the Chaldean Church, and our sister Churches of the East, the persecution that our community is enduring is doubly painful and severe. We are personally affected by need and by the reality that our vibrant Church life is dissolving in front of our eyes.

The massive emigration that is now occurring is leaving my Church much weaker.
This is a deeply sorrowful reality. We who are part of the Church hierarchy are very often tempted to encourage our parishioners to stay—to keep the presence of Christ alive in this special land. But truly I and my brother bishops and priests can do no more than to advise young mothers and fathers to take all the necessary considerations into account and to pray long and hard before taking such a momentous, and perhaps perilous, decision.

The Church is unable to offer and guarantee the fundamental security that its members need to thrive. It is no secret that hatred of minorities has intensified in certain quarters over the past few years. It is difficult to understand this hate. We are hated because we persist in wanting to exist as Christians. In other words, we are hated because we persist in demanding a basic human right.

There are two things that we, as a Church, can do: the first is to pray. The second is to use the relationships and networks we share in as part of the Church of Christ as a pulpit to raise awareness about the true risk to our survival as a people.

I cannot repeat loudly enough that our well-being, as a historic community, is no longer in our hands. The future will come, one way or the other, and for us this means waiting to see what sort of aid (military, relief aid) arrives.

This text is excerpted from a Feb. 11, 2015 address given by Chaldean Archbishop Bashar Matti Warda of Erbil, Iraq to the General Synod of Anglican Bishops in London.


With picture of a refugee in Erbil (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:



Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.


For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org

Thursday, February 19, 2015

ACN News - ACN commits $2.8M in support for Syria’s embattled, oft-forgotten Christians



International Catholic pastoral charity Aid to the Church in Need (ACN) has pledged $2.8 in emergency aid Christians in Syria, who, for the most part, have so far benefited only to a limited extent from relief provided by the UN and other large, secular NGOs.

In many cases, Christians are reluctant to register themselves with aid agencies—and thus formally identify themselves as Christians—for fear of extremist Muslim reprisals who persecute Christians for their faith and their perceived support of the Syrian regime.

In addition, relief efforts have been hampered across the board due to continued fighting and the dramatic rise of ISIS.

ACN will fund a number of projects to help sizeable Christian communities in Aleppo, Homs, Damascus and other cities and villages that have been hard hit by the war, reported Father Andrzej Halemba, the head of the organization’s Middle East section.

Since the outbreak of the civil war in Syria in 2011, hundreds of Christians have died and tens of thousands have been driven from their homes, their houses destroyed or their neighborhoods taken over by hostile forces.

Countless families are without a reliable source of income; children and youth are barred from continuing their education: half of all the country’s schools are damaged, destroyed or used as shelter for fighters.

Hundreds of thousands of Syrian Christians have become refugees in Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan.

Father Andrzej Halemba, citing the concerns of local Church leaders, said: “Aleppo’s Christians are afraid that what happened in Mosul will also happen to them. This is a new and, unfortunately, justified fear of religious cleansing.”

“The Islamic State openly shows its murderous intentions against anyone who does not bend to its brand of extremism.”

Father Halemba charged that the international community—aside from confronting the threat of ISIS—has drifted into a form of neglect of the Syrian crisis. Official estimates hold that 12.2 million people are affected by the war in Syria.

The number of Internally Displaced Persons stands at 7.8 million, while 4.8 million Syrians are living in barely accessible parts of the country or in active war zones.

Some 5.6 million children are directly affected by the war—with the number of students no longer able to attend school standing at 3 million.

ACN’s emergency projects include:

·         Providing 4500 vulnerable families in various cities as well as the countryside with funds to purchase oil, gas electricity and to pay their rent for four months;
·         Ensuring a supply of medical supplies for communities in Aleppo and Hassake for six months;
·         Paying for repairs and fuel costs at half a dozen schools in Aleppo and Damascus;
·         Supporting local Churches in the repair of badly damaged or destroyed infrastructure—churches, catechetical centers, diocesan offices, etc.;

With picture of the remains of St. Mary's, Syrian Orthodox church in Homs, Syria (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:



Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.


For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Ash Wednesday - Meditation


The following is from Holy Hours by Father Mateo Crawley-Boevey, S.S.C.C..

 Jesus: "Alas! There is still worse:  some among them have become wretched apostates, who have for me nothing but hate...They have betrayed Me for a creature, for they have preferred to Me wealth, pleasures, a position,...all things which tomorrow will be changed into a handful of ashes in a tomb...and then there will be the hour of terrible and eternal justice!... And these are My children, brought to life by My power and by My blood, who behave thus!..."

..."Weep, O weep with Me, My fervent friends, zealous apostles!... Is there not in your home, at your own hearth, one of those ungrateful ones?...Perhaps it is a son, a brother, a husband, a father who is far, very far from the altar of his First Communion. The Holy Hour is an act of reparation for their sins, and this reparation will be the beginning of their salvation.  Courage! ... let us save those dear ones in spite of themselves...And as they do not weep, let us weep in their stead; let us pray for them."