Sunday, September 04, 2016

Saint Mother Teresa of Calcutta - Interview

Saint Mother Teresa, pray for us!

Please watch this wonderful interview with our newest saint and Malcolm Muggeridge.  They were interviewed by Father James Lloyd for the television program Inquiry, in 1971.


Click here for video

Friday, September 02, 2016

ACN News - Syrian patriarch – ‘Stop extremists from entering Europe’



By John Pontifex


A leading Syrian prelate urged Europe to take tougher action to stop fundamentalists from entering its territory.

Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem II, the Damascus-based leader of Syriac Orthodox Church, warned of the threat posed by a new generation of radicalized Muslims bent on imposing Sharia law as widely as possible.

While many Muslim refugees entering Europe are peace-loving moderates, he added, Western governments “must be better prepared” to ferret out jihadists.

In an interview with Aid to the Church in Need (ACN), the international Catholic charity, the Patriarch called for a strict screening process of migrants and refugees seeking to enter Europe.

“I do not know how this should happen but it is necessary and should be done without infringing the rights of those who are peace-loving and law-abiding,” he said.

He also called on Western governments to insist permission be granted for the construction of churches in Muslim nations, even as new mosques are built in Europe.

Patriarch Aphrem warned that Christianity is at risk of disappearing from Syria, Iraq and Lebanon. He cited the example of Turkey, whose Christian population a century ago stood at more than 3.5 million but has dwindled to only 150,000 today.

He said that 80 percent of Christians in Iraq had left the country since the overthrow of President Saddam Hussein in 2003; and that 50 percent of Syria’s Christians are either internally displaced or are living as refugees abroad.

ACN is providing food, shelter, medicine and other essential assistance to Christians, other minorities as well as Muslims throughout the region.

The Patriarch said: “The work of ACN is crucial and makes a big difference. Thousands upon thousands of Christians depend on the help they are receiving from ACN and other organizations.”


With picture of Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem II (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:



Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.

For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org


Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Annual Public Rosary



The annual public Rosary in honor of Our Lady of Fatima's last apparition will be held on Thursday, October 13, 2016.

TIME:  2:00 P.M. TO 4:00 P.M.

PLACE:  Ala Moana Beach Park, Picnic Area 1 and 2, directly across from Macy's Department Store at Ala Moana Center

PROGRAM SCHEDULED:  Public procession
Divine Mercy Chaplet
Holy Rosary

Please join us in honoring Our Lady the year before we celebrate the 100th anniversary of Fatima.

Please help spread the news.

Monday, August 29, 2016

Novena - Mother Teresa of Calcutta



Picture source

Please join the Missionaries of Charity in praying the novena to soon to be Saint Mother Teresa of Calcutta.  The novena started on August 27th but if possible, join in today.

NOVENA


f I ever become a Saint—I will surely be one of
“darkness.” I will continually be absent from
Heaven—to light the light of those in darkness
on earth
Blessed Teresa of Calcutta

Dear Friends
May the Peace of Christ fill your heart as you place all your trust in Him.
I would like to invite you to pray with us the novena to Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Feast day on September 5, which starts on 27 August. Pray with us the novena to Blessed Teresa

Please know that we keep you and your intention is our prayers very especially during this novena.
Let us also implore God for the peace in the world for all famines and all those who suffer from natural disasters  and for an end to abortion and euthanasia and a respect for every human life.
God bless you always
United in prayer
Sincerely yours in Jesus
Sr. M. Elia, M.C.



cid:image002.jpg@01D0E038.457FD3E0 

PS:
Just think that God is thirsting for you ....Blessed Teresa of Calcutta
I would like to invite you in this coming weeks  to enter more deeply into the mystery of Jesus’ thirst and to satiate that thirst according to the example of Mother Teresa. On the 10th September will be the anniversary of Mother Teresa’s mystical encounter with Jesus, later called “Inspiration day” within the religious family she founded. We invite you, to join us in preparation. So that we, with St. John, “come to know and to believe in God’s love for us,” (1 Jn. 4:16) “Faith, which sees the love of God revealed in the pierced heart of Jesus on the Cross, gives rise to love. Love is the light – and in the end, the only light – that can always illuminate a world grown dim and gives us the courage needed to keep living and working. Love is possible, and we are able to practice it because we are created in the image of God. To experience love and in this way to cause the light of God to enter into the world …” (Encyclical Letter Deus Caritas Est January 25, 2006 Pope Benedict XVI) – this is the invitation Mother Teresa extends to us. Through these following meditations we invite you to enter more deeply into the mystery of Jesus’ thirst and to satiate that thirst according to the example of Mother Teresa, thus illuminating the world with His love.
        For this please visit: http://www.motherteresa.org/11_encounter/encounter.html
                                                                           http://www.motherteresa.org/11_encounter/MT_Ithirst/IThirst.html
                                                                          http://www.motherteresa.org/11_encounter/index_1.htm
                                                                          http://www.motherteresa.org/11_encounter/1_T/index.html
                                                                          http://www.motherteresa.org/11_encounter/Therese/index.html
                                                                          http://www.motherteresa.org/11_encounter/w/index.html
                                                                          http://www.motherteresa.org/11_encounter/Be/index.htm

Monday, August 15, 2016

Mary's Assumption Pertains to Us

The Assumption of Mary by Paolo Veronese (Caliari)
Picture source

Happy Feast Day!


by Brother John M. Samaha, S.M.

            Like every doctrine of faith, Mary's Assumption into heaven body and soul is about us too.  Mary is our model in faith, charity, and perfect union with Christ.  She teaches us  how to live in a faith-filled and loving way. 

            Mary's Assumption teaches us how to live with hope even in dying, how to anticipate our eternal destiny.  The Solemnity of the Assumption, observed on August 15, celebrates the completion of Mary's transformation by the Holy Spirit, being taken to heaven not only in soul but also in body.
            Mary's Assumption brings us hope because it reminds us that what happened to Mary is our destiny too.  The Preface of the Mass declares that the Assumption is "the beginning and the image of Your Church's coming to perfection and a sign of sure hope and comfort for Your people."

            We are the Church.  Mary's bodily assumption is a harbinger of what will happen to us.  What God has done for Mary gives us hope and comfort in what He will do for us. 

            St. Paul reminds us that even in this life believers are already being transformed into the image of Christ.  "All of us, gazing with unveiled face on the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from glory to glory as from the Lord who is Spirit" (2Cor 3:18).  This transformation affects not only our souls but also our bodies.  "...we groan within ourselves as we wait for adoption, the redemption of our bodies" (Rom 8:23).  Our bodies will be conformed to the body of Christ.  "He will change our lowly body to conform with his glorious body by the power that enables Him also to bring all things into subjection to Himself" (Phil 3:21).  This transformation results from Jesus' victory over the power of sin and death in His own death and Resurrection.

            The opening prayer for the August 15 Eucharistic Liturgy asks that "always attentive to the things that are above, we may merit to be sharers of her glory."  Living in tune with God as Mary did, we will also undergo the transformation of both our souls and our bodies. 

            The post communion prayer requests that "through the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, whom you assumed into heaven, we may be brought to the glory of the Resurrection."

            When celebrating the Solemnity of Mary's Assumption in 2010 Pope Benedict XVI offered this clear description in his homily.  "...the Mother of God is inserted to such a degree in the mystery of Christ that she shares in the resurrection of her Son with her whole being already at the end her life, she lives what we hope for at the end of time...."  

            While admiring Mary in her glorious destiny, we are invited to recognize that the loving Lord has willed for our final destiny to live through faith in perfect union with him. 

            Our predecessors in faith professed their firm hope in "the resurrection of the body" in the Apostles Creed and in the Nicene Creed.  We rarely think about the resurrection of our bodies.  Yet this article of faith greatly encourages us, comforts us at the death of loved ones, and raises our awareness of the value of our bodies. 

            The Assumption of Mary vividly reminds us that our lives have a special destiny with God.




Saturday, July 30, 2016

Holy Hour of Adoration to celebrate the opening of ​the 100th Anniversary of the Miracle of the Sun at Fatima within the Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy.



In anticipation of the 100th Anniversary of Fatima next year, the is a call for parishes to hold a holy hour of adoration on October 13th, 2016. For more information please visit: Solidarity in Prayer

Friday, July 29, 2016

Meatless Friday Meal - Succotash



This version of succotash is made with Edamame, (soy bean) instead of the traditional Lima Beans.


Ingredients:

1 large green pepper (or any other color sweet pepper), diced evenly.
Kernels of two large fresh corn on the cob
1 package of frozen Edamame, cooked according to package direction.  Drain, cool and remove from pods
Salt and pepper to taste
1 tablespoon butter

Melt the butter in a large cast iron skillet.  Add all ingredients and fry on medium high heat for approximately 3 to 5 minutes or until some of the vegetables start to brown.  Salt and pepper to taste.

Serves two or three.  This recipe can be doubled.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

ACN News - South Sudan – ‘The worst is still to come’



By Clare Creegan


A project partner of Aid to the Church in Need (ACN) has warned that the upsurge of fighting in South Sudan will mean a worsening of the humanitarian crisis affecting millions of civilians.

One of the Catholic charity’s South Sudanese project partners, who cannot be named for security reasons, described how renewed violence in Juba has caused immense suffering and increased insecurity amongst its people.

Referring to calls from the governments of neighboring countries Uganda and Kenya for their citizens to leave South Sudan, he said, “The way the various governments all over the world are panicking and acting shows that they fear that something terrible is still to happen.”

“One can even hear that ‘the worst is still to come!’”

The religious Brother also described how the South Sudanese people were prohibited from leaving the country and were suffering from food shortages – but thanked ACN for their solidarity.

He said, “Let’s pray that the nightmare in Juba and all around the country is soon coming to an end.”

“People just cannot stand this hell any longer. I am seeing people leaving Juba in big numbers, mostly to Uganda, whenever they find a possibility and when they can afford it.”

Through the Church, 1,385 registered families – which numbered 7,183 displaced people – were able to receive support at St. Paul’s Seminary campus in Juba.

The renewed fighting is a major setback for South Sudan’s peace process which had been troubled by ceasefire violations and localized outbreaks of violence since the peace agreement signed by rival leaders President Salva Kiir and Vice President Riek Machar in August 2015.

Tensions came to a head on July 7, following an attack in Juba close to where the President and Vice President were meeting.

Continued fighting is reported to have left more than 300 dead and the death toll is expected to rise as fears of a return to civil war increase.

Aid to the Church in Need is supporting ongoing projects in South Sudan including aid to help build a presbytery for the newly established parish in Barsherki in the Diocese of Wau.

In 2015, the charity also gave more than $950,000 to fund the Church’s pastoral work with refugees in South Sudan.


With picture of people waiting for transportation to escape the violence (© ACN)


Editor’s Notes:



Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.

For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org


Saturday, July 23, 2016

Our Lady's Bird is Our Lady Bug



Picture source

Nice way to honor Our Lady on her day.

by Brother John M. Samaha, S.M.


          What insect has such a colorful and fascinating history as the ladybird, also known more popularly as the ladybug?  In an age of faith when people saw earth mirroring heaven, this tiny creature was thought to enjoy the special protection of the Virgin Mary.  Reversing its role in the last two centuries, this small symbol of Our Lady burst into prominence as a protector of people and their food supply.  As the enemy of aphids, the ladybird has rendered service calculated in the billions of dollars in the past century alone.  We have good reason to be grateful for this little beetle and to the Lady for whom it is named.

A problem of infestation


          Agricultural specialists first became interested in the ladybug when California orange groves were mercilessly attacked by a voracious insect pest in the latter half of the nineteenth century.  Already in 1880 agricultural experts discovered that a parasitic insect was infesting some orange trees in California’s Santa Clara Valley.  The infestation was known locally as “San Jose scale.”  Eventually it was traced to the flowering peach trees imported from China.  These trees were infected with tiny sap-sucking insects until then unknown in the western world. 

          The deadly visitor insect from Asia found the orange trees a delicious victim and spread quickly.  They multiplied so rapidly that they became a mortal threat to the citrus industry in all of California.  By 1893 horticulturalists were occasionally finding specimens along the Atlantic seaboard.  Five years later the havoc wreaked by these aphids was so grave that the German emperor forbade the importation of American fruits and living plants.

 

Finding an antidote


          In the meantime, the Department of Agriculture had its specialists launch a counterattack.  They tried a variety of pesticides, but with little success.  Orange trees were dying by the hundreds of thousands.

          Mr. C. V. Riley, chief entomologist of the Department of Agriculture, suggested that aphids could be controlled by introducing other insects which would prey on them.  In 1890 such a proposal seemed radical and preposterous, and drew scoffs even from close associates.

          But that did not daunt C. V. Riley.  Working against indifference and opposition, he was determined to find a creature to attack the aphids devastating the citrus trees of the nation.  He learned that aphids caused little harm in Australia, and concluded that some natural enemy was keeping them under control. 

          Mr. Albert Koebele was dispatched to discover that foe of plant lice.   He concluded that a variety of the harmless ladybug beetle was the antidote.  Gathering ladybugs from Australian plants by hand, Koebele shipped 140 of these plant-saving beetles to an associate in Los Angeles.  When set free in an infested orange grove on trees covered with gauze screens, the ladybug liberators cleared these trees of scale within a few days.

          More ladybugs were imported, and California scientists began to raise them in wholesale quantities.  In California citrus groves they brought cottony-cushion scale under control within two years.

          Following this success, this variety of beetle was introduced to more than thirty countries.  Without exception they reduced or eliminated that damage of scale insects which infest citrus trees.

          So dramatic and conclusive was the ladybird experiment that it marked a turning point in scientific agriculture.  From that time hundreds of experiments have been made to find insects which would control insect pests and noxious plants.  Economic entomology, now a major operation in several countries, is an outgrowth of the ladybird experiment to salvage California’s orange-growing business.

Significance of the name


          The ladybird, or ladybug, rose to the rescue as the protector of the human food supply.  Although this was a new role for the colorful beetle, the bright insect had been well known for centuries.

          How did it become known as “Our Lady’s Bird?”  No one seems to know exactly.  In Elizabethan times many common creatures were attributed names with a sacred association.  Such names were usually local in character.  In the case of the ladybird, another factor came into play.  Not only was it a colloquial name employed in a few areas of England, but it found its way into many languages in forms closely related.

          In German the tiny critter was called Marienhuhn (Mary’s chicken), Marienkafer (Mary’s beetle), and Marienwurmschen (Mary’s little worm).  Marienkuh was an earlier form related to the English “lady-cow.”  The Swedes used the name Marias Nyckelpiga, and the farmers still call the insect “the Virgin Mary’s golden hen.”  A slightly different tack is taken in French and in Spanish.  In these languages the names link the insect with the protection of God.  The French call it la bĂȘte a bon dieu (God’s animal), while the Spanish use the name Vaquilla de Dios (God’s little cow).

          Both coincidence and cultural exchange fall short in explaining so widespread a view concerning an insect.  Scientific names in Latin are common to many nations and languages.  But it is extraordinary for folk names to be so closely parallel.  Why should people in so many different lands envision the ladybug as enjoying heavenly protection, especially that of Mary?

          Here is the most reasonable guess.  Persons who have grown up in rural areas know that birds and animals almost always leave the ladybird strictly alone, for the ladybird is proficient in chemical warfare.  It produces a yellowish fluid which it discharges in time of danger.  Though seldom noticed by the blunted human sense of smell, this serum is highly repulsive to foes of the ladybird.  Consequently the bright bug goes about its business with virtual immunity from attack.

          Amazed at the beetle’s sheltered and protected life, the human observers probably concluded that it enjoyed the special favor of the Lady whom they themselves venerated and whose assistance they sought.  It seemed natural to call the insect Ladybird.  One might also conjecture that people saw a similarity in the creature’s charmed life to the preservation of Our Lady from sin.  In the England of that time the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception was a popular belief and prominently discussed.  English dialects included variant titles like Lady-beetle, Lady-clock, and Lady-cow.  Standardization of speech erased these names, and gradually the capitalization of the first letter was discontinued.  Now only the scholarly reader continues to find in this insect’s name a reference to earlier reverence and Marian relation.

          Farmers of Elizabethan England may not have understood clearly the economic significance of the ladybird, but they knew that it fed on other insects.  Hops, long a major crop, are vulnerable to the attack of plant lice.  Ladybirds abound in hop fields.  They were probably observed in action more closely than the lack of written descriptions would indicate.  Not until 1861 did scientific records mention that ladybirds feed on the aphids which infest hops.

          Folk literature preserves some clues.  One is the fact that even today the children of many lands know some form of this rhyme.
                  
                  

Ladybird, Ladybird, fly away home!
                   Your house is on fire,
                   Your children do roam.
                   Except little Ann, who sits in a pan
                   Weaving gold laces as fast as she can.

Children recite that rhyme after a ladybird has been placed on an outstretched finger.  This practice has changed little through the centuries as indicated by a woodcut which dates from the reign of King George II.  The woodcut depicts a child addressing a ladybird before flight.

          Having more rhyme than reason, the jingle’s significance is clearer in view of its historical setting.  Farmers often gathered hop plants and burned them when the harvest was finished.  Ladybirds swarmed and children enjoyed warning the little birds to flee from danger.  “Little Ann” was the name for a young grub of the ladybird attached to a leaf and shedding its skin, or “weaving gold laces.”

An important function


          When scientists determined that the ladybird is a natural foe of many plant parasites, they began raising them in special insectaries, especially along the Pacific Coast of the United States, since this region experienced the most devastating attacks by aphids and scales.

          Experts opine that the ladybird will never become obsolete and outlive its usefulness for agriculture.  The life-saver beetle is more efficient for many operations that any pesticide yet devised.  Those reared under natural conditions are more abundant and important than those produced by insectaries.  In the United States alone at least 350 varieties have been identified.  The protective work of the ladybird is responsible for a huge saving annually for the country’s farm economy.  Without it, growers would be at a loss to produce substantial crops of needed fruits.

          With no inkling of its significance in their own era or its future role in world agriculture, medieval farmers reverently named the little beetle Our Lady’s Bird.  How appropriate that the creature so named became a protector of our food supply and the symbol of a branch of applied science.  Eyes of faith allow us to see that Our Lady’s Bird is in fact a messenger from a provident God.    






Thursday, July 21, 2016

ACN News - Aid to the Church in Need sends 3,500 young people to World Youth Day 2016



By Maria Lozano


Some 3,500 young people from 29 different countries will be able to attend World Youth Day in Krakow, Poland July 25-31, 2016, thanks to the support of international Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need (ACN).

Many of the youth hail from countries close to Poland: “The young people of Ukraine, Bosnia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Russia and Macedonia are delighted at this opportunity to come together personally with Pope Francis in Poland.”

“Due to the costs involved, most of them have never had the opportunity to participate. For this reason we wanted this year in particular to enable as many young people as possible to personally experience this closeness with the Pope and with other young people from all over the world.” This was the assessment of Magda Kaczmarek, one of ACN’s project coordinators for Eastern Europe.

Meeting with the Pope and living out the experience of the Universal Church can likewise be a life-changing experience for young people from many of the tiny Catholic communities of Central Asia, such as Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Turkmenistan, which is believed to have little more than 100 active Catholics.

The organization has also made it possible for youth from the Middle East to attend World Youth Day 2016. They will represent Churches that are coping with great suffering in countries like Iraq, Syria, Jordan and Palestine. Their presence will personify both the hope of the early centuries of Christianity and the courageous faith of the present-day descendants of the early Christians.

ACN is also sending youth from Sudan and Bangladesh to Krakow, to represents two more countries where Christians daily face discrimination and violent attacks.

Relying on the generosity of its donors, ACN will be able to make a huge difference in the lives of so many young people.

Their experience of World Youth Day, however, does not just depend on financial support—ACN is also calling on its donors around the world for fervent prayer to make the event a success and to make it possible for youth from countries and regions embroiled in violent conflict to be able to make the journey to Krakow and back home again in safety.

In all, ACN is funding 40 different World Youth Day 2016-related projects, the bulk of them to send youth to Poland. Total funding involved tops $600,000, which also makes possible events in particular countries that will take place simultaneously with World Youth Day, such as a national event in Cuba and other Latin American nations.

Close to one million young people are expected to attend World Youth Day 2016. For more information on ACN’s involvement in World Youth Day 2016, see:



With picture of World Youth Day volunteers (© ACN)



Editor’s Notes:


Directly under the Holy Father, Aid to the Church in Need supports the faithful wherever they are persecuted, oppressed or in pastoral need.  ACN is a Catholic charity - helping to bring Christ to the world through prayer, information and action.

Founded in 1947 by Father Werenfried van Straaten, whom Pope John Paul II named “An Outstanding Apostle of Charity,” the organization is now at work in over 145 countries throughout the world.

The charity undertakes thousands of projects every year including providing transport for clergy and lay Church workers, construction of church buildings, funding for priests and nuns and help to train seminarians. Since the initiative’s launch in 1979, 43 million Aid to the Church in Need Child’s Bibles have been distributed worldwide.

For more information contact Michael Varenne at michael@churchinneed.org or call 718-609-0939 or fax718-609-0938. Aid to the Church in Need, 725 Leonard Street, PO Box 220384, Brooklyn, NY 11222-0384.  www.churchinneed.org